Lady and the Tramp II – Scamp Lithographs from The Disney Store

Here we have another direct-to-video sequel of a Disney classic. Scamp’s Adventure centers on Lady and the Tramp’s only son, Scamp, who longs for freedom from house rules and desires to become a “wild dog”.

Adventure ensues, as the title suggests, with a happy ending for all. In case you’re wondering, Lady and the Tramp had four puppies, named Annette, Collette, Danielle and Scamp.

Let’s have a look at the lithographs released by The Disney Store to commemorate the release of this movie:

Scamp Folder Cover

Both Sides of the Tracks

I vaguely remember this movie but do remember that I wasn’t particularly impressed. Most direct-to-video releases seemed to be rushed and merely produced to generate revenue, not memorable stories.

What is worth remembering is this beautiful folder:

Scamp Folder Unfolded

Which Side Are You From?

This is a basic grass-is-always-greener story with dogs. I guess we could say that Scamp has a strong urge to piddle in someone else’s lawn!

Of course, there is a love element to the story, as seen in the recreation of the iconic spaghetti scene from the original classic:

Scamp Print SpagettiScamp Moonlight BarkScamp Escape from PoundScamp Togetherness

The Plot in 4 Lithographs

My recommendation would be to skip this effort. But if you could pick up a set of these lithographs, that would be worthwhile!

Scamp Folder Back

Back of Presentation Folder

I also have a great set of Disney Store lithographs featuring the original cast of Lady and the Tramp. Definitely worth a sniff!

Lilo & Stitch Lithographs from The Disney Store

Disney’s Lilo & Stitch was a surprise hit when it debuted in 2002. The little blue ‘dog’ found its way into everyone’s heart, but most of all into the heart of a girl named Lilo.

With a story that features the value of family, this movie became an instant classic! The Disney Store released a wonderful set of lithographs to commemorate the release of the film on video:

Stitch Folder

Like some of these releases, this one featured an inventive cover folder. When opened, it yields a nice Hawaiian panorama.

Let’s lift the first flap:

Stitch Folder Open

Lifting the first flap reveals a beautiful pastel sky and a surprised Stitch being kissed by Lilo. Now there are two flaps that open sideways. Below is how the folder looks from the back when fully opened:

Stitch Folder Back

And next we see how the folder looks from the front when fully opened:

Stitch Folder Front

Surf’s Up!

The prints tuck in behind the sand in the middle. And now for a look at the prints themselves:

Stitch Print OneStitch Print TwoStitch Print Three

Did you enjoy Lilo & Stitch when you first viewed it? Has it become one of your Disney favorites?

For more fun with Lilo and Stitch, check out a WDCC figurine featuring Stitch, and a Disney Animator’s Collection doll featuring Lilo.

Winnie the Pooh Lithographs from The Disney Store

I’ve gone on record to state my dislike of sequels. Direct-to-video being the worst offenders. And even though Walt Disney himself didn’t like them, or repeating himself (“You can’t top pigs with pigs.”), I have come to realize that a business like Disney (the company) must do what it has to in order to remain in the black. And so we have ended up with a series of lackluster outings into The Hundred Acre Wood. The one featured here is known as Winnie the Pooh’s Grand Adventure: The Search for Christopher Robin (released August 5th, 1997).

Winnie the Pooh Folder

Front of Folder

The Disney Store released a nice set of four lithographs to coincide with the video release. Each is on archival stock paper and presented inside an amazing folder.

Winnie the Pooh Folder Back

Back of Folder

Sometimes, The Disney Store provides a fun package for the prints, and this release is certainly a good example. Let’s begin to open the folder:

Winnie the Pooh Folder Open

Top Flap Opened Upwards

Winnie the Pooh Folder Map

Close-up of Map

Winnie the Pooh Folder Long

Folder Opened Completely

I haven’t seen this movie in years and so don’t remember if it managed to capture the magic of the first series of Shorts. But here is a brief synopsis of the storyline: The story begins on the last day of summer. Christopher Robin is unable to tell his friend Winnie-the-Pooh some sad news, that he is going off to school and won’t be around as much. Pooh doesn’t understand the absence of his friend and goes to Owl to get a note, left by Christopher Robin to explain, interpreted. Owl deduces that Christopher Robin has been taken to a distant, mysterious and dangerous place called “Skull” against his will, to a cave where the monstrous “Skullasaurus” resides. Owl equips the group with a map and sends them into the “Great Unknown” of the Hundred Acre Wood. There are mishaps aplenty until Christopher Robin returns from school and finds them. They return home, and that evening, Christopher Robin says he will return to school the next day. Pooh declares that he will always be waiting for him.

Whether the movie was good or not, the prints in this set are excellent! Let’s have a look:

Winnie the Pooh Print ThreeWinnie the Pooh Print OneWinnie the Pooh Print TwoWinnie the Pooh Print Four

All’s Well That End’s Well!

This adventure of Winnie the Pooh and his friends would definitely appeal to the younger Disney fan!

Can’t get enough Pooh? Then eat more fiber and check out these posts featuring the little yellow bear in pewter, egg form, and all lit up.

Well, tut tut, it looks like the post is finished. Oh, bother!

Snow White Lithographs from The Disney Store

We’ve covered some of the other Princesses in an earlier post, and now it’s time for the original, the fairest of them all, to have her turn. In this post we have Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (what can I say, they go everywhere together!)

I am featuring two different lithograph releases. The first has four prints:

Snow White Set Folder

Regal

The envelope that contains the prints is made of a very heavy museum-quality paper with a nice texture. The prints are also rendered on better quality paper than some Disney Store lithographs.

And speaking of lithographs:

Snow White Set 3Snow White Set 2Snow White Set 1Snow White Set 4

‘Hi Ho’ and there you go! Even though Snow White was released back in the 1930’s it still contains some of the most breathtaking imagery of any Princess movie!

Snow White Set Folder Back

Above is the back of the folder which sports a very famous fruit.

The set above was released in 2001 to commemorate one of the many re-releases of this most classic of classics. The single lithograph below is an earlier release from 1994. Neither release coincides with a major anniversary of the film:

Snow White Single Envelope

Over-sized Envelope

Unfortunately, this lithograph has been damaged by moisture. However, it is unique in that it’s one of the few releases to be bigger than the 8×10 format of most other Disney Store prints.

Snow White Single LithoSnow White Single Litho Back

Lithograph & Back of Frame

So when asked which lithographs are the fairest of them all, I think you will agree that these ones, featuring Snow White, are certainly the front runners!

Princess Lithographs from The Disney Store

The Disney Princess. Iconic and controversial all at once, but still a marketing juggernaut, these ladies turn heads for whatever reason! And so do these stunning lithographs from The Disney Store.

We have a lot to see, so let’s get right to it:

Priness Envelope SBPrincess Print SBPrincess Frame SB

Sometimes The Disney Store releases multiple lithographs in a set, with either 4 or 6 prints. But this one only has the one print.

Princess Envelope CPrincess Print C

Cinderella also gets the one-print treatment for her video re-release.

And now we move on to a more modern era Princess with a set of 4 prints from Beauty and the Beast:

Princess Folder B&BPrincess B&B Print 1Princess B&B Print 2Princess B&B Print 3Princess B&B Print 4Princess Folder Back B&B

And these lithographs will live happily ever after in my media collection! As will these lithographs featuring The Little Mermaid.

For more Princess fun, check out how they use the stairs on a Disney Cruise, and how they would be described by today’s Paparazzi.

Pixar Lithographs from The Disney Store

I wish I had a complete set of lithographs representing the entire Pixar catalogue of films, but at least I have these three. The Disney Store did a great job with the selection of prints.

Let’s have a look. First, we have the original Toy Story from 1995:

Pixar Envelope Pixar Print Pixar Frame

This lithograph would have been released for the 1996 video release. The above pictures show the protective envelope, the lithograph itself, and the back side of the lithograph frame.

Next, we have a wonderful image from A Bug’s Life (1996):

Pixar Envelope Pixar Print Pixar Frame

Again, this lithograph would have been released in 1999 to commemorate the release of the film on video.

Last, but not least, is Toy Story 2 (1999):

Pixar EnvelopePixar PrintPixar Frame

This was released in 2000.

And that concludes my incomplete collection of Pixar lithographs from The Disney Store.

If you have a bit more time and would like to see more of my Pixar merchandise, check out these keychains and minis figurines.

Flubber Lithograph from The Disney Store

Who remembers what Flubber is? Well, it can make Model T Fords fly, basketball players jump higher, and in the 1997 reboot, it can even dance! In this version, Robin Williams stars as the renamed Prof. Philip Brainard.

But Flubber first appeared in The Absent-Minded Professor, a 1961 Disney live-action film based on the short story ‘A Situation of Gravity’ by Samuel W. Taylor. The film stared Fred MacMurray as Professor Ned Brainard, the accidental inventor of Flubber.

The film was a huge success at the box-office, and two years later became the first Disney film to have a sequel, 1963’s Son of Flubber. But the lithograph in this post promotes the 1997 remake called Flubber:

Flubber Back of Lithograph

Flubber Cover SleeveFlubber Cover Back

Front and Back of Envelope & Rear of Lithograph

This is the only lithograph I have from The Disney Store that is lenticular. And what is ‘lenticular’ you ask? Lenticular printing is a technology in which lenticular lenses (a technology that is also used for 3D displays) are used to produce printed images with an illusion of depth, or the ability to change or move as the image is viewed from different angles.

The latter part of the definition applies here. Look at the lithograph one way and the Flubber couple are dancing:

Flubber Dance

Getting their groove on!

Turn the lithograph slightly, and the Flubber couple are in a full dip:

Flubber Dip

Gutsy move!

While this makes for an interesting print, it makes it a lot harder to photograph! It’s quite possible that Disney put a little more tech into this lithograph because of the scientific nature of the movie.

Who knows, maybe these little green blobs will bring back Disco. But let’s hope not!

For more on the star of the original movies, Fred MacMurray, please read my post entitled Top Five Live-Action Disney Actors.

101 Dalmatians Disney Store Lithographs

Today’s post has really gone to the dogs, quite literally! We are sharing six Disney Store lithographs that were offered to promote the video release of 101 Dalmatians.

101 Dalmatians Front Cover

101 Dalmatians Back Cover

This envelope has a nice synopsis of both the film and the film-making process on the back. The 1961 animated version was the first to use the Xerox process for copying the many spots needed to render the 99 puppies and two adult dogs in the film.

The six lithographs from this set are among the few I’ve seen with captions describing the scenes. Let’s have a closer look. We begin with the announcement that Pongo is going to be a father:

101 Dalmatians Happy Couple

“After all, dogs were having puppies long before our time.”

We then skip to the birth where there is a slight problem:

 101 Dalmatians Lucky

“Nanny! Fifteen! We still have fifteen.”

Here we see the reviving of the last puppy born, whom Roger saves, and so gives the name of ‘Lucky’. Life resumes as we see the proud parents watching some quality television with their puppies:

Fan Favorite TV

“Ol’ Thunderbolt’s the greatest dog in the whole world.”

But things don’t stay tranquil for long after Cruella De Ville arrives with her own reason for loving the puppies:

101 Dalmatians Cruella

“Yes… yes, I must say… such perfectly beautiful coats.”

Jumping ahead we rejoin the story after the puppies have been stolen and the dogs of the city are using the Twilight Bark to relay the message that help is needed:

101 Dalmatians Pet Shop

Peg, Bull, and the Twilight Bark

In this scene, we are treated with guest appearances from Peg and Bull from another animated Disney film about dogs, Lady and the Tramp.

Later the puppies are found, but now there are 99!

101 Dalmatians Escape

“This way, children, around this way.”

All’s well that ends well as the farm animals help free all of the puppies. In the end, all 101 Dalmatians live together on a big farm in the country. The end!

This was the 17th feature-length animated film released by Disney and it did very well at the box office. After all, who can resist 99 cute little puppies?

For more fun with the 101 Dalmatians film, check out our earlier post entitled Could This Be Cruella De Ville’s Real Car? which shows a vintage 1929 Auburn 8-120 automobile that just may have inspired the animated copy.

Fan Favorite Movies as Disney Store Lithographs

We all have our all time favorite Disney animated movie. I personally have several! So what is your fan favorite? Maybe it will be one of the seven Classic films depicted here in these lithographs from The Disney Store.

Let’s have a look at both the packaging and the actual prints from each film in the order they were released theatrically:

Fan Favorite Bambi Cover

Bambi 1942 – 5th Feature-length Film

This lithograph was released by The Disney Store in 1997 as a promotional giveaway when one preordered the film on video.

Fan Favorite Bambi Lithograph

Bambi Meets the Rest of the Cast

Fan Favorite Bambi Back Cover

Back of Envelope

Next we visit Neverland:

Fan Favorite Peter Cover

Peter Pan 1953 – 14th Feature-length Film

This lithograph has one of the better envelopes for a single print release. Most will have a blank back cover, but this one gives us something more:

Fan Favorite Peter Hook

“Smeeeeeeeee!”

And now for the lithograph itself:

Fan Favorite Peter Lithograph

Again, this lithograph gives us a little something extra by having a beautiful map of Neverland on the back of the frame:

Fan Favorite Peter Back Cover

Next we go black and white, mostly:

Fan Favorite 101 Front Cover

101 Dalmatians 1961 – 17th Feature-length Film

This film has had more than one Disney Store lithograph release but I like this envelope the best of the two offered.

Fan Favorite 101 Envelope

Pongo and Perdita

And now for a domestic scene we can all relate to:

Fan Favorite 101 Lithograph

TV Time!

And now we head into deepest darkest Africa:

Fan Favorite Jungle Cover

The Jungle Book 1967 – 19th Feature-length Film

I love Colonel Hathi and his Elephant Patrol! So this sleeve cover was a treat to see. But so was the lithograph:

Fan Favorite Jungle Lithograph

Just the Bare Necessities!

In my opinion, The Jungle Book was as perfect an animated movie as you could ever create! So I guess you could say this is my fan favorite.

Fan Favorite Jungle Back Cover

Released in 1997

Hard to believe that this lithograph was released 20 years ago! Now we have a live-action movie adaption of this classic. Have you seen it? I posted a review comparing the 1967 original with the new 2016 version. I picked a winner. Click on over to see which version it was!

We have three lithographs left as we now transition from the 60’s to the 70’s:

Fan Favorite Cats Cover

The Aristocats 1970 – 20th Feature-length Film

So this was released 26 years after the film had its theatrical release. I love the gray scale artwork for the cover sleeve.

Fan Favorite Cats Lithograph

Free Transportation

Fan Favorite Cats Back Cover

And now we leap from the 70’s all the way to the 90’s and into the middle of the Disney Renaissance:

Fan Favorite Aladdin Cover

Aladdin 1992 – 31st Feature-length Film

This was a concurrent release with the film in theaters. By now The Disney Store was releasing simpler versions of lithographs with basic cover sleeves. The lithographs were of slightly larger size however. With standard lithographs, you get an 11 x 14 overall size which includes the frame. With later lithographs, you now got an 11 x 14 picture with the frame adding extra size.

Fan Favorite Aladdin Lithograph

It’s a Whole New Hug!

We conclude with another 90’s hit:

Fan Favorite King Cover

The Lion King 1994 – 32nd Feature-length Film

This sleeve sports a pleasing pattern. And the lithograph:

Fan Favorite King Lithograph

Meeting of the Minds (Mash Banana)

This, like the Aladdin print, is oversized.

Fan Favorite King Back Cover

So which is your fan favorite? Do you like the prints small or larger? Do you think The Disney Store should always release lithographs with interesting cover sleeves, or does that not matter to you, as you’ll just throw them away anyway?

Classic Animated Films as Disney Store Lithographs

Disney struggled for a while with the animated division of the company. Film after film failed at the box office and disappointed fans. But then a string of what we now consider classic films came along to bolster the confidence of Disney and Disney fan alike. That string of films came to be credited as creating a Disney Renaissance.

But before and after this period, Disney still released the odd film that just didn’t capture the imagination, nor most importantly the money, of the movie-going public. Let’s have a look at some of these. First:

Classic Rescuers Front Cover

The Rescuers – 1977

This film shouldn’t really be in this post as many Disney fans love it very much. But it rarely shows up on anyone’s all-time favorites list! It spawned a sequel (The Rescuers Down Under – 1990) and left us with two endearing characters in Miss Bianca (Eva Gabor) and Bernard (Bob Newhart).

Classic Rescuers Lithograph

Everyone needs an Evinrude motor!

The Rescuers is filled with many charming and heart-warming scenes which make the film a definite classic!

Classic Rescuers Back Cover

The Rescuers was the 23rd feature-length animated film from Disney and is about the Rescue Aid Society, an international mouse organization headquartered in New York City that shadows the United Nations and is dedicated to helping abduction victims around the world. Sounds plausible!

The second film I will feature here is one of my personal favorites:

Classic Mouse Front CoverClassic Mouse Front Cover 2

The Great Mouse Detective – 1986

This is the 26th feature-length animated movie released by Disney and is based on the character of Sherlock Holmes. His mouse counterpart lives under his floorboards and is named Basil of Baker Street.

Classic Mouse Lithograph

Basil and Oliva find a clue!

I love the Sherlock Holmes character and have read all of the original stories as well as collected almost all of the movie adaptions, both from television and the silver screen.

Classic Mouse Back Cover

Promoting the re-release in 1999

The plot is long and convoluted as one would expect from a Sherlock story with lots of twists and turns. It also stars Vincent Price as the villain! Why didn’t this film do better at the box office? There’s just no figuring people.

If you like the characters from this film, check out this great ornament, also from the Disney Store.

The third movie is one I can’t stand to watch and haven’t added to my personal collection:

Classic Oliver Front Cover

Oliver & Company – 1988

Again, this lithograph from the Disney Store was released in 1996 to promote a video re-release.

Classic Oliver Lithograph

Cast of Characters

I felt this film relied too heavily on an all-star cast, most prominently Billy Joel and his music. It wasn’t enough to save this dog of a film, pun intended. It felt more like a Don Bluth effort along the lines of All Good Dogs Go to Heaven which also didn’t have teeth at the box office.

Classic Oliver Back Cover

This film was Disney’s 27th feature-length animated effort. It was inspired by the classic Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist but casts Oliver as a homeless kitten who joins a gang of dogs to survive in the streets. It’s a pity this film survived the development phase!

Lastly I am thrilled to share another of my favorite, yet again not-so popular, films:

Classic Atlantis Front Cover

Atlantis, The Lost Empire – 2001

So now we jump ahead a couple of decades and well after the Disney Renaissance to an ambitious film that just didn’t quite cut it. Disney had planned to reinvent the submarine ride in Disneyland based on this film but poor box office made us have to wait until Finding Nemo to go under the water again.

Classic Atlantis Lithograph

This was Disney’s 41st feature-length animated film and its first animated science fiction attempt. Even the star-power of Michael J. Fox couldn’t float this one with fans and it sank.

Classic Atlantis Back Cover

Disney tried to mine the Steampunk vibe for this film but even that didn’t help it to catch an audience. Pity!

So how do you feel about these four movies? Are they near misses or enduring classics? Let me know in the comments section!