Fan Favorite Movies as Disney Store Lithographs

We all have our all time favorite Disney animated movie. I personally have several! So what is your fan favorite? Maybe it will be one of the seven Classic films depicted here in these lithographs from The Disney Store.

Let’s have a look at both the packaging and the actual prints from each film in the order they were released theatrically:

Fan Favorite Bambi Cover

Bambi 1942 – 5th Feature-length Film

This lithograph was released by The Disney Store in 1997 as a promotional giveaway when one preordered the film on video.

Fan Favorite Bambi Lithograph

Bambi Meets the Rest of the Cast

Fan Favorite Bambi Back Cover

Back of Envelope

Next we visit Neverland:

Fan Favorite Peter Cover

Peter Pan 1953 – 14th Feature-length Film

This lithograph has one of the better envelopes for a single print release. Most will have a blank back cover, but this one gives us something more:

Fan Favorite Peter Hook

“Smeeeeeeeee!”

And now for the lithograph itself:

Fan Favorite Peter Lithograph

Again, this lithograph gives us a little something extra by having a beautiful map of Neverland on the back of the frame:

Fan Favorite Peter Back Cover

Next we go black and white, mostly:

Fan Favorite 101 Front Cover

101 Dalmatians 1961 – 17th Feature-length Film

This film has had more than one Disney Store lithograph release but I like this envelope the best of the two offered.

Fan Favorite 101 Envelope

Pongo and Perdita

And now for a domestic scene we can all relate to:

Fan Favorite 101 Lithograph

TV Time!

And now we head into deepest darkest Africa:

Fan Favorite Jungle Cover

The Jungle Book 1967 – 19th Feature-length Film

I love Colonel Hathi and his Elephant Patrol! So this sleeve cover was a treat to see. But so was the lithograph:

Fan Favorite Jungle Lithograph

Just the Bare Necessities!

In my opinion, The Jungle Book was as perfect an animated movie as you could ever create! So I guess you could say this is my fan favorite.

Fan Favorite Jungle Back Cover

Released in 1997

Hard to believe that this lithograph was released 20 years ago! Now we have a live-action movie adaption of this classic. Have you seen it? I posted a review comparing the 1967 original with the new 2016 version. I picked a winner. Click on over to see which version it was!

We have three lithographs left as we now transition from the 60’s to the 70’s:

Fan Favorite Cats Cover

The Aristocats 1970 – 20th Feature-length Film

So this was released 26 years after the film had its theatrical release. I love the gray scale artwork for the cover sleeve.

Fan Favorite Cats Lithograph

Free Transportation

Fan Favorite Cats Back Cover

And now we leap from the 70’s all the way to the 90’s and into the middle of the Disney Renaissance:

Fan Favorite Aladdin Cover

Aladdin 1992 – 31st Feature-length Film

This was a concurrent release with the film in theaters. By now The Disney Store was releasing simpler versions of lithographs with basic cover sleeves. The lithographs were of slightly larger size however. With standard lithographs, you get an 11 x 14 overall size which includes the frame. With later lithographs, you now got an 11 x 14 picture with the frame adding extra size.

Fan Favorite Aladdin Lithograph

It’s a Whole New Hug!

We conclude with another 90’s hit:

Fan Favorite King Cover

The Lion King 1994 – 32nd Feature-length Film

This sleeve sports a pleasing pattern. And the lithograph:

Fan Favorite King Lithograph

Meeting of the Minds (Mash Banana)

This, like the Aladdin print, is oversized.

Fan Favorite King Back Cover

So which is your fan favorite? Do you like the prints small or larger? Do you think The Disney Store should always release lithographs with interesting cover sleeves, or does that not matter to you, as you’ll just throw them away anyway?

Thumper or Miss Bunny: A Figurine Investigation

So most cartoon bunnies look alike. Male or female, they all look alike. So what do animators do to differentiate one from another? Sometimes they will use color changes, size, or most often eye lashes. We will consider some of these techniques and others to determine if the ceramic figurine we have in this post is Thumper or his girlfriend, Miss Bunny.

Before we get into our investigation, let’s have a look at the suspect:

Thumper Front

Suspect: Bucktoothed and Cute

CLUE No. 1

When we purchased this figurine the Seller gave us a card that was given to him when he himself obtained it. Such provenance is often helpful in determining exactly what an object is. Take a look:

Thumper Card

After some research we were able to determine that these ceramic figurines, made by Evan K. Shaw Pottery, were indeed produced in the early 1940’s. But we were still unconvinced that what we had was ‘Thumper’s Girl’.

We began our investigation by checking the Internet for other examples of the piece to see what online Sellers were claiming it was. Some said ‘Thumper’ while others said ‘Miss Bunny’, or ‘Bixbi’, as some Disney fans have named her (she is not given a name in the original movie).

We also found other small ceramic figurines that were definitely depicting a female bunny, that were brown, and posed differently than ours. It was this figurine that was consistently called ‘Miss Bunny’ and not the version we have. So we now had a majority consensus.

But our figurine could still be another version of Miss Bunny, as some were claiming.

CLUE No. 2

Next we need to consider the color of the piece. Let’s have another look at it:

Thumper LeftThumper Right

Brown Fur

This is a confusing clue, but stay with us. Thumper, in the movie Bambi, was gray, not brown. So we could arbitrarily pronounce this character to be Miss Bunny, who was brown, based solely on that parameter. However, pottery companies were notorious for going off-model when creating their pieces, getting features and colors wrong more often than not. It wasn’t until later that Disney started to tighten up on its demands for standardization of its character merchandise.

So this clue is inconclusive.

CLUE NO. 3

Eyelashes have been the stereotypical way of depicting a female character in the world of animation since the beginning of the medium. Our figurine has three short upward eyelashes, and not the multiple swept-back lashes of a female character.

CLUE NO. 4

Sometimes, if you know the character well enough, you can recognize them by body language. Of course, in the case of a sculpture, this technique will depend on the artist portraying such characteristics in his artistry.

Thumper Back

Thumper was very expressive with his ears. Many times he would have one ear up with the other ear down. This was a way of distinguishing him from his many brothers and sisters in the film.

The ceramic figurine we have exhibits this trait.

CLUE NO. 5

Lastly, we checked the figurine for any markings that could help us to identify it.

Thumper Bottom

No such luck!

Ceramic figurines are either stamped with black ink, engraved, or sport a sticker, usually on the bottom of the piece. This example has none of these markings, so no help there for our investigation.

CONCLUSION:

We believe this figurine to be Thumper. And here’s why:

  • General consensus gathered from Internet Sellers
  • Frequency of wrong use of color for Disney characters by manufacturers
  • Eyelashes are consistent with male characters
  • Body language, specifically the ears, is consistent with the character

We hope the techniques of this detailed investigation will help you to identify your treasured pieces of merchandise! And you can see more of Thumper as a lawn ornament by clicking the link. Or for a Disney-themed joke featuring Thumper (and other characters) check out this link.

Disney’s Read-Along Books and Records: 1970’s

Welcome to more of my record/book collection! This post will feature releases from 1973 and 1977.

Vintage Record Readers 046

Robin Hood

This is the only version I have from 1973. It now carries the tag line “Walt Disney Productions’ Story of” instead of the earlier “Walt Disney Presents” and “Walt Disney’s Story of” tag lines.

Vintage Record Readers 047

The coloring page is now gone with the extra page being used to finish the story. As with most record/books, the original story is pretty much in tact. It also includes two songs from the film: ‘The Phony King of England’ and ‘Oo-De-Lally’.

Now let’s visit 1977:

Vintage Record Readers 040

Pinocchio

This story is altered somewhat, with Monstro the whale not making an appearance, and that part of the tale being all-but ignored. The book simply says Pinocchio had adventures which taught him enough lessons to earn his transformation into a real boy.

Vintage Record Readers 041

The coloring page is back!

Vintage Record Readers 042

Bambi

A major story deviation happens in this reader! Bambi’s mother does not get shot by Man, but simply disappears from the storyline midway through the book.

Vintage Record Readers 043

The coloring page in this book is actually a continuation from the story, which is new for these readers.

The last record/book I have from the date of 1977 has a new tag line: “Authorized Walt Disney Productions’ Edition” of

Vintage Record Readers 044

The Rescuers

Disney decided to spare young readers from the grizzly end of the villain with this record/book. We do see Medusa climbing up the boats smoke stack, but only to yell about the loss of her diamond. In the movie, her alligators turn on her and are ready to eat her!

Vintage Record Readers 045

Unfortunately, the coloring page is again missing from this release!

I have a bonus record/book for you! I don’t know the date for it, but it does have a special feature:

Vintage Record Readers 048

101 Dalmatiens

Although I can’t read this French edition, I can tell from the pictures that the story has been significantly altered. Disney once again spares young readers from the horrible car accident that kills Cruella De Ville in the movie.

Vintage Record Readers 049

And no coloring page again!

If you love these old collectibles as much as I do, please see my other post entitled:

Disney’s Read-Along Records and Books: 1960’s

A ‘Trip to Disneyland Game’

I have quite a collection of Disney games. You can see most of them in the post entitled Disney Game Night.

With the 60th Anniversary of Disneyland I thought it might be nice to take a closer look at one of the games from that earlier post, namely:

Trip to DL Game 001

Made in Canada by Somerville Limited

This is a very simple game. It can be played by 2 or 3 players. Let’s have a look at the game pieces:

Trip to DL Game 002

Still on the original card

Note that the wild card is called a Master Card and, of course, it is Walt Disney! I was delighted to find that this game had not even been used, which boosts its value as a collectible. Now let’s see the game board:

Trip to DL Game 003     Trip to DL Game 004

Trip to DL Game 005

That’s one long game board!

Each player puts his pawn on the start area under one of the three lanes and draws 6 cards. The player will stay in this lane throughout the game. The first player spins and moves the amount of spaces indicated. To advance, the player must have a card that matches the character on the space he occupies. If not, they draw a card. If they still do not have the character, play moves to the next player.

There are free spaces and wild cards to help things along. The game ends when someone arrives at Disneyland! Unfortunately, not the real one.

Trip to DL Game 006

Which color do you want? (I want red)

The game can be won in 19 moves plus however many missed turns a player may get. Again, not the most difficult game in the world, but that’s why it is for ages 6-10.

It is likely that this game is from the 1970’s or 80’s based on the artwork.

FUN FACT: This game was manufactured in London, ON which is under 2 hours away from where I currently live! Well, it’s a fun fact for me.

Top 5 Disney Characters Stuck in Time

Every Disney character embarks on a journey of personal discovery and change. None are the same at the end of their movie. Usually the character is stronger and better for the effort, and we cheer when we see the ‘New Them’!

But do we always see them in their new and improved versions? Here is a list of my Top 5 Disney characters that we stubbornly insist on seeing as they started, not as they finished:

N U M B E R     F I V E

Rapunzel

Rapunzel Blonde     Rapunzel Brunette

Rapunzel went through quite a change in the course of her movie. From a shy, dominated shut-in to an independent go-getter with a frying pan! She chose to follow her dream and found true love by helping to redeem a lost soul. Not bad in just under 2 hours of screen time!

The most visible change was the cutting of her hair at the end of her movie, which robbed her of her healing powers (mostly) and her trademark long golden locks. But we refuse to see her as a short-haired brunette and so she is forever stuck in our minds and hearts as a blonde with mile-long strands of hair.

N U M B E R     F O U R

Ariel

Ariel w Tail     Ariel w Feet

Ariel is another Princess who had a lot to learn before she matured. Making the journey from an irresponsible daughter to a strong bridge between two worlds wasn’t easy, but Ariel made the journey one step at a time. And that brings us to our premise.

Ariel starts off as a mermaid, complete with tail and land-based mobility issues. But thanks to some undersea magic, she switches to legs and… what are those things called again? Oh yeah: feet! Ariel is lower on this list because we do see her in both configurations.

But with a nickname like The Little Mermaid, I think it’s safe to assume that the vast majority of us still see her with a tail, even though she walked into her happily ever after on two strong legs.

N U M B E R     T H R E E

Beast

Beast Animal     Beast Human

For the majority of his time in the movie Beauty and the Beast, the Beast was, well… a beast, not a man. It wasn’t until he won the love of Belle in the last few minutes of screen time that he became the human prince of Belle’s dreams.

But we definitely see him as he was, not as what he became. And after all, if we didn’t, we’d have to change the title of the movie to Beauty and the Prince, which we all can agree just wouldn’t be the same!

N U M B E R     T W O

Bambi

Bambi Young     Bambi Older

The Prince of the Forest made quite a transformation in his movie, actually growing up into a majestic stag before our very eyes by the end credits. But just like overly possessive parents, we still think of Bambi as our little baby!

Bambi is high on this list, although not Number One, because he made one of the most drastic transformations, but we still refuse to acknowledge it.

N U M B E R     O N E

Pinocchio

Pinocchio Puppet     Pinocchio Real

So who went through more changes than our Number One Disney character stuck in time? Pinocchio started off as just a piece of wood carved to resemble a little boy. Then, this marionette came to life, walking and talking and getting into all sorts of mischief. But this wasn’t the end of little Pinocchio’s journey!

By the end of the film, Pinocchio achieves his fondest wish: To become a real boy. The Blue Fairy deems the puppet worthy because of his selfless act to save his ‘father’,  Geppetto. Now that’s a change, not only worthy of cheering, but remembering!

But poor Pinocchio! He is doomed to live out his time in our memories as an animated piece of wood, and not the real boy he worked so hard to become.

disH O N O R A B L E     M E N T I O N

Yzma

Yzma Human     Yzma Kitten

Yzma spends most of her screen time in The Emperor’s New Groove as a very old woman who most describe as ‘scary beyond belief’ before becoming a cute little white kitten. A cute little white kitten with homicidal tendencies, but a cute little white kitten nonetheless.

However, despite transforming into a completely different life-form, we still remember her as that scary-beyond-belief woman of our nightmares. Doesn’t seem fair somehow…

So did I miss any Disney characters that you feel are stuck in time? If so, fill us all in by leaving a comment below!

Vintage Disney Story Books

Guest Contributor: Nick Maglio

These 2 books from the early 1940’s belonged to my Father-in-Law, Dan.

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Pinocchio.
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Given as a gift to Dan from his mother in 1944.
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Copyright 1939, 1940 by Walt Disney Productions, Hollywood, California.
D.C. Heath and Company, Boston.
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Nice spot illustrations are throughout the book.
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A very well loved book, several pages are loose.
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Walt Disney Story  Books.
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Bambi was given as a gift to Dan from his Grandmother in 1945.
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Copyright 1944 by Walt Disney Productions.
D.C. Heath and Company, Boston.
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These wonderful books were passed on to my wife, and then her younger sister. He recently re-discovered them, and has passed them on to me.
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Single Bambi Bookend


As a single bookend, this item has little commercial value as a Disney collectible. It’s interesting how often you can find single bookends at flea markets and yard sales, probably because ceramic is easy to break. This one has no indication of when it was made, and no real proof that it is, in fact, Bambi.

The bookend is 6.5″ tall and 4.5″ wide


Doing a Google search, I found it under Bambi Ceramic Bookend, but again, as there are no markings on this one indicating it is a Disney licensed product, it is still in question. As for date, I simply find “Vintage” and “1950s”.


I have found many different ‘Bambi’ ceramic items, none having identification. They look nice, so if bought, they would at least make a good conversation piece.

Walt Disney Classics Collection: Bambi & Flower

Guest Blogger: Nick Maglio

The very first movie I can recall seeing was “Bambi” in my hometown movie theater. Some of the images and emotions of this classic have remained with me my entire life, and it is near the top of my all time favorites. I have several Bambi items in my collection, and I am happy to share one I just recently added. Back when the Walt Disney Classics Collection started, I was much younger, and didn’t have the resources to buy many of the WDCC figures I so desired.

Fast forward almost 20 years (!), and my finances have improved, while, often, the prices for WDCC figures have come down, and are more in a price range I’m comfortable with. Such is the case with this Bambie figurine:


This is one of those pieces that makes me smile every time I look at it, and makes me ask myself why I waited so long to get him.


He stands 6″ high, and carries the 1993 Treble Clef production mark. The official title of this piece is “Purty Flower”.


Who is Bambi looking for? Why, the Purty Flower of course!


And here he is now!


I’ve had Flower since 1993. I picked him up because he was a more affordable price, with the hopes that I’d be able to get Bambi at some point in the future.


Watch it!


Flower stands 3″ high, and also carries the 1993 Treble Clef production mark. “Oh…Gosh” is his response to Bambi’s “Purty Flower” comment.


And here they are together, finally, after almost 20 years!


Why are my eyes damp? Must be allergies. (ahem, sniff).

I have 2 other pieces from this set, also purchased waaay back in 1993, so please click this link to see them.