101 Dalmatians Disney Store Lithographs

Today’s post has really gone to the dogs, quite literally! We are sharing six Disney Store lithographs that were offered to promote the video release of 101 Dalmatians.

101 Dalmatians Front Cover

101 Dalmatians Back Cover

This envelope has a nice synopsis of both the film and the film-making process on the back. The 1961 animated version was the first to use the Xerox process for copying the many spots needed to render the 99 puppies and two adult dogs in the film.

The six lithographs from this set are among the few I’ve seen with captions describing the scenes. Let’s have a closer look. We begin with the announcement that Pongo is going to be a father:

101 Dalmatians Happy Couple

“After all, dogs were having puppies long before our time.”

We then skip to the birth where there is a slight problem:

 101 Dalmatians Lucky

“Nanny! Fifteen! We still have fifteen.”

Here we see the reviving of the last puppy born, whom Roger saves, and so gives the name of ‘Lucky’. Life resumes as we see the proud parents watching some quality television with their puppies:

Fan Favorite TV

“Ol’ Thunderbolt’s the greatest dog in the whole world.”

But things don’t stay tranquil for long after Cruella De Ville arrives with her own reason for loving the puppies:

101 Dalmatians Cruella

“Yes… yes, I must say… such perfectly beautiful coats.”

Jumping ahead we rejoin the story after the puppies have been stolen and the dogs of the city are using the Twilight Bark to relay the message that help is needed:

101 Dalmatians Pet Shop

Peg, Bull, and the Twilight Bark

In this scene, we are treated with guest appearances from Peg and Bull from another animated Disney film about dogs, Lady and the Tramp.

Later the puppies are found, but now there are 99!

101 Dalmatians Escape

“This way, children, around this way.”

All’s well that ends well as the farm animals help free all of the puppies. In the end, all 101 Dalmatians live together on a big farm in the country. The end!

This was the 17th feature-length animated film released by Disney and it did very well at the box office. After all, who can resist 99 cute little puppies?

For more fun with the 101 Dalmatians film, check out our earlier post entitled Could This Be Cruella De Ville’s Real Car? which shows a vintage 1929 Auburn 8-120 automobile that just may have inspired the animated copy.

Could This Be Cruella De Ville's Real Car?

I know I claimed to have found her real car before (see the post entitled Disney Cars for Real) but this time I think I’ve really discovered it! Here is a screen shot of her animated car from 101 Dalmatians:

cruella-de-villes-car

In the live-action adaptions her car is white and black and is based on a Panther De Ville. In the television series her car is also white and black and is based on a Zimmer Golden Spirit.

Not much is available on the Internet about the make or model of the animated red and black version. But while visiting The Greenfield Village during the Old Car Festival I managed to snap these shots:

greenfield-village-jj-068

greenfield-village-jj-069

1929 Auburn 8-120

Cruella wasn’t on hand but is this a match for her animated car or what? And although it would have looked more sinister if she was standing beside it herself, I think I managed to get a picture of one of her henchmen sitting in the Model T Ford in the background. But is he Jasper or Horace?

Anyway, I was glad to be able to see such an iconic Disney vehicle for real!

FUN FACT: In the original 101 Dalmatians books Cruella’s car is white and black like a zebra. But it’s easy to imagine why that coloring would have been hard to animate against largely white backgrounds with the bulk of Disney’s animated movie being ‘shot’ in winter. But red and black would stand out!

Of course, this doesn’t explain why Disney set a animated feature about predominantly white dogs in the season of winter…

Disney Cars for Real

Disney animators love to give character to inanimate objects. And when they are fleshing out a human character, they usually imbue any objects they use or possess with a complimentary character trait.

While looking through my pictures from both the Motor Muster and Old Car Festival, held in Greenfield Village each year, I began to notice that I had some interesting Disney car tie-ins. Don’t know what I mean?

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Exhibit One: Herbie Blushes

I was taking close-up pictures of some of the cars to get cool reflections and to optimize the shapes and features of each car. The shot above, of a Volkswagen Beetle, made me think of an embarrassed Herbie!

Scrncap2     DC Prof

Exhibit Two: Prof. Ned Brainard’s Flying Model T Ford

Inside the Henry Ford Museum you can see how an actual Model T Ford was constructed, and sit in or pose with an original model, as above. Yet no matter how much Flubber I used, I just couldn’t get this one to fly!

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Exhibit Three: Cruella De Ville’s evil-looking Bugatti

I’m not sure just what model Cruella’s car was supposed to be in the animated film 101 Dalmatians, but it looks an awful lot like the vintage Bugatti above. Think how cool it would have been if this white Bugatti was covered in spots! But being as there are only 3 or 4 of these left in the world, and only this one in North America, I don’t suppose the museum will be upgrading the paint any time soon.

Scrncap10     DC Hudson Hornet

Exhibit Four: Doc Hudson as The Fabulous Hudson Hornet

The film Cars by Pixar came out in 2006 and I took the above picture in 2009. At the time, I never even clued in that I was looking at the inspiration for Doc Hudson’s racing career. And it took until 2014 for me to even realize I had this shot! It just goes to show that you never know when a Disney reference will pop up in your life.

For more information about this Disney reference, please visit my post entitled Keith Partridge Buy’s Pixar’s Doc Hudson over at My Dreams of Disney.

Scrncap6     DC Muppets MW

Exhibit Five: Interpol car from Muppets Most Wanted

Not an exact match, but when art imitates life, art often takes liberties. I think the essence of the fake car is definitely present in the real car! Sadly, no muppet emerged from the yellow version.

So if Beaker were a car, he’d end this post simply by saying: “Beep, beep!”