Mystery Stack Pack featuring Disney Tsum Tsum

Good old Walmart. Always a toy on the shelf, and as it happens, on sale! The Tsum Tsum craze is moving along with more merchandise twists added to capitalize. And so we have Tsum Tsum Mystery Stack Pack.

Mystery Stack Pack Group

 Series 2

Actually, I picked up nine packages, some from Walmart and the rest from Toys-R-Us. Both had them on sale for under $3.00 CAN per pack. With each package, you get a small Tsum Tsum figure and a stacking accessory.

Mystery Stack Pack Baggies

A Mystery No More!

Out of the nine mystery packages I purchased, I got three of one character (The Red Queen) but no other duplicates. So not a bad average for a blind buy!

So here are the seven characters I got:

Mystery Stack Pack Queen of HeartsMystery Stack Pack Queen Stacked

The Red Queen

Mystery Stack Pack MickeyMystery Stack Pack Mickey Stacked

Mickey Mouse

Mystery Stack Pack ChipMystery Stack Pack Chip Stacked

Chip

Mystery Stack Pack SuzyMystery Stack Pack Suzy Stacked

Suzy (from Cinderella)

Mystery Stack Pack EeyoreMystery Stack Pack Eeyore Stacked

Eeyore

Mystery Stack Pack OlafMystery Stack Pack Olaf Stacked

Olaf

Mystery Stack Pack Jiminy CricketMystery Stack Pack Jiminy Stacked

Jiminy Cricket

These are designed to stack on the back of the medium Tsum Tsum characters. You can stack them on each other but then they are wobbly at best! It is pretty hard to get the character to stay on his/her own prop!

Here is a group shot:

Mystery Stack Pack Group Shot

Which Is Your Favorite?

The Series 2 set has fifteen characters including Buzz Lightyear and the LGM from Toy Story. These were the two I was hoping for.

Now I don’t know whether to go back and buy more Mystery Stack Pack, er… packs, or just be satisfied with what I have. Blast these mystery packs/blind boxes of Disney!

In case you aren’t up on just what a Tsum Tsum is:

Disney Tsum Tsum is the name of a range of collectible toys based upon Disney characters (including characters from the Disney-owned Star Wars and Marvel franchises). The name is derived from the Japanese verb tsumu meaning “to stack”, because the toys are shaped like rectangles and designed to stack on top of each other, forming a pyramid shape.

With four basic sizes and a few different materials, there is a Tsum Tsum for everyone. At least, that’s what Disney marketing hopes!

Check out more of my Tsum Tsum collection here.

Anna from FROZEN Disney Infinity Figure

The Disney Infinity gaming system is no more but merchandise from the line is still lingering on store shelves. Drastic price reductions makes filling out your 1.0/2.0/3.0 play pieces easier on the pocket book, restricted only by the remaining stock. I just picked up the last Anna 1.0 figure (from FROZEN) at my local Toys-R-Us.

Anna Figure Front

Ready for Action!

I am on record for really hating the Disney movie, FROZEN. It failed on so many levels, but the one shining light that broke through the disappointment was the character of Anna! Rather than making a fuss over The Snow Queen, Elsa, I believe Anna to be the one true hero of the movie and the one that should be looked to as a role model.

Anna Figure Package FrontAnna Figure Package Back

Packaging

Elsa may have the cool powers, but it’s Anna who has the responsible, loving, go-getting attitude that should be admired.

Anna Figure Side left

Rope at the Ready

Actually, Anna does have a ‘power’ in the Disney Infinity universe. Her climbing hook conquers heights and helps her swing past danger.

Anna Figure Back

Practical Hair Braid

I love the detail of Anna’s costume. The little flowers around her skirt are beautiful!

Anna Figure Side right

What’s in the Bag?

Nice detailing on the boots, too! Each Disney Infinity play piece is mounted on a base, usually specific to the character. Here, Anna is standing on a snow flake.

Each figure comes with a card with a code to unlock on-line extras:

Anna Figure Card

Code on Back

I haven’t checked, but one may assume that such codes are useless now that Disney has abandoned the franchise.

So are/were you a Disney Infinity fan? How do you feel about Disney’s decision to discontinue the gaming system after only three years?

For more gaming figures, see Yoda and Han Solo, Darth Vader and Baloo, and my picks for Disney’s Top 5 Worst Decisions, which includes ending the Disney Infinity gaming system.

Disney Infinity 3.0 Discontinued Gaming Figures

I attended the launch of this new gaming system at the El Capitan Theatre in California back in 2013. It was called Disney Infinity 1.0 back then, to be followed by the money-grabbing Disney Infinity 2.0 and Disney Infinity 3.0.

Disney Infinity 3.0 Launch

I had a media pass and a first look at what would become a very exciting gaming platform. It built a rabid fan base with online competitions and Disney-sponsored contests, so naturally, Disney chucked the whole concept as of 2016.

I consider the cancellation of Disney Infinity to be one of Disney’s Top 5 Worst Decisions ever! But as I’ve said over and over again, at least we are left with some of the most awesome displayable figures ever to be created!

Here is the Han Solo 3.0 figure:

Disney Infinity 3.0 Solo

Face is a bit off…

Disney Infinity 3.0 Solo Back

… but the cool meter is off the scale!

Since the cancellation of the gaming system, I’ve been watching the stores for slashed prices on remaining figures. And, not surprisingly, Wal-Mart was one of the first to take a Lightsaber to the prices.

So I also picked up Yoda 3.0:

Disney Infinity 3.0 Yoda

Now this is spot on!

Disney Infinity 3.0 Yoda Back

“Young Yoda not need cane, he doesn’t!”

I’m not keeping these awesome figures in their original packaging as they will not likely maintain any real collectible value, both due to the short time they were available to build a fan base, and the millions of units that were produced. Plus, I want to display them!

Disney Infinity 3.0 Solo PackageDisney Infinity 3.0 Solo Package Back

Disney Infinity 3.0 Yoda PackageDisney Infinity 3.0 Yoda Package Back

I’m in a funny position. I am angered at how Disney handled this division but also have to admit that, although I own a 1.0 version of the game, I have yet to play it! Check out my post about that here.

But again, I have collected over a dozen figures and may one day use them for their intended purpose. Until then, I will play with them thusly:

Disney Infinity 3.0 Confrontation

Mexican Stand-off in Space

For a closer look at Darth Vader, click the link. Star Wars figures just started appearing with the Disney Infinity 3.0 launch.

So do you have a Disney Infinity gaming platform? Are you disappointed that it was cancelled?

Collecting Toys Magazine: February 1996 Issue

1996 Nostalgia. Who can resist it? We are ready again to revisit the days of our youth and remember the carefree days when the worst problem we faced was which toy to play with! In this post you will find another issue of Collecting Toys Magazine.

I was reunited with more of my old toys as I turned the pages of this issue of Collecting Toys:

Toys Cover 96

Slot Cars Rule!

Let’s have a look at some of the contents of this issue from 1996:

Toys New Stuff

What’s New?

From an Extreme G.I. Joe action figure to the superhero The Tick, 1996 was ready to kick some serious butt! And there were diecast model cars, too!

Toys Bond

Bond. James Bond.

“No, Mister Bond. I expect you to DIE!” Sorry, I just had to add one of my favorite Bond villain quotes from the Sean Connery days (bonus points if you know the Bond film this is from). Although I have to say that Pierce Brosnan is probably my second-favorite Bond! And he was trending in 1996.

Toys Action Figures

Action Figures

Don’t call them ‘dolls’ or Batman will beat you up! I had a few characters from this line, but I remember Spiderman the most. I also had The Lone Ranger and Tonto and Evel Knievel, complete with stunt bike! Man, I miss those toys.

And if you feel boys can play with dolls, not just action figures, check out this newer product called the Wonder Crew that I reviewed from the Chicago Toy Fair.

Toys Soldiers

Toy Soldiers

I had dozens of the traditional green toy soldiers but had never seen these Blue and the Gray versions. Must have been an American thing.

Toys Show

Antique Toy Show

Toy shows and Antique fairs are amazing places to visit! I zeroed in on this one because of the monster in the bottom right corner. We have Super 8 footage of this guy rolling around our living room back when my sister and I were quite young. This battery-operated toy was the Great Garloo by Marx and measured in at a whopping 23″ tall! The 1960’s were all about the science fiction monsters.

Toys Zoo

Zoo. In. Spaaaaaaaaaace!

Where else would you put a zoo that had metal animals? Think this sparking dog is weird? Just try to imagine the whale and the elephant!

So there we have a look back into the toys of our past. I hope you enjoyed some nostalgic moments!

Collecting Toys Magazine: February 1995 Issue

1995 Nostalgia. Who can resist it? We all love to revisit the days of our youth and remember the carefree days when the worst problem we faced was which toy to play with! Collecting Toys Magazine is a great source to find those old toys we loved so much but parted with as we grew older.

I was reunited with some of my old toys as I turned the pages of this issue of Collecting Toys:

Collecting Toys Cover 95

Japanese Robots

What I like about finding these vintage magazines is the wealth of relevant information they still contain. From manufacturing information to variants to seeing the collections of others, the only information not relevant is the values. But even outdated values can be interesting!

Let’s have a look at some of the contents of this issue from 1995:

Collecting Toys New Stuff

What’s New?

This spread is fun because it shows what was new in 1995, over 20 years ago. New then, vintage now!

Collecting Toys 3 Wheeler

Three-Wheeled & Ready to Roll

My family is originally from England so vehicles like this have a soft spot in my heart. European cities traditionally have narrow streets so 3-wheeled vehicles like this model are very common. This model is of a truck produced in Japan, where they have the same problem. I wish I had one here in Canada! A real one and a model.

Collecting Toys Robot

Behold: GIGANTOR

Can we just agree that Japanese metal robot toys are about the coolest toys in creation?!? Although plentiful, these toys still command a high price from collectors!

Collecting Toys Rollercoaster

1930’s Chein Roller Coaster

This is a good example of how manufacturers worked in the past. They would have one style of toy and simply stamp different characters or scenes onto it to make a new toy. So this roller coaster (above) is identical to the one I have, except mine has a Disney theme. Check the version I have by clinking the link here.

Collecting Toys Soccer

Soccer or Football?

Either way, this game by Subbuteo scored big with kids of all ages. You played with your fingers and could choose from multiple teams, just like the standard table hockey games.

Collecting Toys Hot Wheels

HOTWHEELS Are Good!

No toy collecting magazine would be complete without a spread about Hotwheels, perhaps the most famous slot racing company around. If you were a boy in the 1980’s you had dozens of these little metal cars!

Collecting Toys Pee Puppy

Please Control Yourself!

It’s bad enough to have a real puppy wetting all over the house, I can’t imagine a parent buying a child a fake puppy to water the remaining dry areas of the family home! Each to his or her own, I guess. And I really didn’t need to see where the pee comes out!

So there we have a look back into the toys of our past. I hope you enjoyed some nostalgic moments!

Tsum Tsum Stackable Collectible Figurines

Disney and I have a partnership going that is pretty lopsided! They put out collectible whatever and I buy it. They get my money, and I get… stuff. Case in point: Tsum Tsum stackable collectible figurines!

Tsum Tsum Front Packaging

Nine in a Set

I’ve resisted branching out into the smaller plastic versions of this merchandise line after adding an assortment of the original plush versions to my collection. You can see those here. The link will take you to a Swedish Chef Tsum Tsum, but that post has a link to other plush Tsum Tsum characters as well.

Tsum Tsum Back Packaging

The Backside of Tsum Tsum

And by ‘backside’ I mean their backsides! Don’t look at Snow White, it would be rude.

Now let’s free the little critters:

Tsum Tsum Open Packaging

Who is the mystery character?

More on who the mystery character is later. In each of these sets, you get three large, three medium, and three small sizes of characters. My large characters are:

Tsum Tsum Stitch

Stitch

Tsum Tsum Snow White

Snow White

Tsum Tsum Eeyore

Eeyore

My medium characters are:

Tsum Tsum Lady

Lady

Tsum Tsum Hiro

Hiro (Mystery Character)

I was pleasantly surprised to get Hiro, as Big Hero 6 is one of my favorite Disney movies!

Tsum Tsum Buzz

Buzz Lightyear

I actually broke down and bought this set solely because of this Buzz Lightyear figure. Buzz as a tiny gerbil? Irresistible!

And finally, my small characters are:

Tsum Tsum Tiny Ones

Joy, Piglet, and Mickey Mouse

A secondary reason for buying this set was to obtain the Joy character for my wife.

These silly little things could definitely grow on me and I already realize that I will have to put up a strong fight against buying more! And how will I know what to look for?

Tsum Tsum CG Cover

Tsum Tsum Collector Guide

This little fold-out booklet comes with every set of Tsum Tsum stackable figures. What I purchased is part of the Series 2 collection:

Tsum Tsum Collector Guide

40 Characters in all!

Now keep in mind that if you want the complete series, you will have to collect 120 individual pieces, as each character comes in all three sizes of small, medium, and large. Depending on how Disney has apportioned the characters throughout the packs, you will have to buy at least 13 packs at $19.97 each. Round that up to an even $20.00 and those 13 packs are going to cost you $260.00 CAN.

Now I’m sure I’ve seen duplicates of characters in multiple packs, which means you will have to buy more packs and you will end up with duplicate characters. So I advise trading with friends!

So will you zoom zoom to the store to buy these Tsum Tsum figures?

Snoopy Plastic Figurine by Schleich

Snoopy has a had quite the career. When not sleeping atop his doghouse he takes to the skies in his Sopwith Camel to do battle with the Red Baron. Now that’s exciting, but especially for a dog!

We’d better have a look at this prestigious pooch:

Snoopy Standing Tall

Always on top of something!

Charles M. Shultz created the Peanuts comic strip which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000, continuing in reruns afterward. And although the star of the strip was good ‘ol Charlie Brown, it was his dog that really rose to the top.

Snoopy Side

Classic Profile

Snoopy joined the comic strip two days in on October 4th, 1950.

Snoopy Profile

Snoopy is a loyal, innocent, imaginative and good-natured beagle who is prone to imagining fantasy lives, including being an author, a college student known as “Joe Cool” and a World War I Royal Flying Ace.

Snoopy Sopwith Camel

Sopwith Camel

The Sopwith Camel was a British First World War single-seat biplane fighter aircraft introduced on the Western Front in 1917. It had been developed by the Sopwith Aviation Company as a successor to the earlier Sopwith Pup and would become one of the most iconic fighter aircraft of the First World War.

Snoopy is perhaps best known for his fighter ace persona, wearing an aviator’s helmet and goggles and a scarf.

Snoopy Headgear

This little PVC (plastic) figurine was produced by the Schleich company and is a current release available in stores now.

Snoopy Label

Schleich was founded by Friedrich Schleich in 1935. Its figurines were first released in the 1950s with the development, production and marketing of comic figurines such as Snoopy and The Smurfs. In the early 1980’s they added animal figurines and Muppet characters to their range of products.

So is Fighter Ace Snoopy your favorite, or is Joe Cool more your speed? Either way, you have to agree this is one canny canine!

Classic Tigger Figurine by Beswick of England

So are you a fan of the classic Winnie the Pooh look or have you grown up on the Disney version? I like both, but I must say, this classic Tigger figurine by Beswick is awesome:

Tigger Figurine front

T I double Guh Ur!

Alan Alexander Milne was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie the Pooh and for various poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of Pooh overshadowed all his previous work. And then Disney got ahold of his franchise and the rest is history!

Tigger Figurine right sideTigger Figurine left side

“And we’re the only ones!”

John Beswick Ltd., formerly J. W. Beswick, was a pottery manufacturer, founded in 1892 by James Wright Beswick and his sons John and Gilbert in Longton, Stoke-on-Trent. In 1969, the business was sold to Doulton & Co. Ltd. The factory closed in 2002 and the brand John Beswick was sold in 2004. The pottery company was chiefly known for producing high-quality porcelain figurines like the one featured here.

Tigger Figurine back

Psst! Look behind you!

In 1952, Beswick began manufacturing a range of Disney characters including Snow White, Mickey Mouse, and Bambi. And of course, the cast of the Winnie the Pooh stories. It is likely that the Pooh figurines were released in the late 1960’s according to a consensus of eBay Sellers.

Tigger Figurine bottom

This Tigger was one of a set of eight characters:

Tigger figurine set

The gang’s all there

Tut, tut! I must say that Piglet seems twice his usual size in comparison to the other characters. “Probably my fault” says Eeyore.

These figurines are plentiful on eBay and other selling sites and range in asking price from $20 to $90 each. My advice would be to buy the lower-priced offerings.

To see more Tigger figurines, check out these archived posts featuring one from Britto and another from the Arribas Brothers.

Thumper or Miss Bunny: A Figurine Investigation

So most cartoon bunnies look alike. Male or female, they all look alike. So what do animators do to differentiate one from another? Sometimes they will use color changes, size, or most often eye lashes. We will consider some of these techniques and others to determine if the ceramic figurine we have in this post is Thumper or his girlfriend, Miss Bunny.

Before we get into our investigation, let’s have a look at the suspect:

Thumper Front

Suspect: Bucktoothed and Cute

CLUE No. 1

When we purchased this figurine the Seller gave us a card that was given to him when he himself obtained it. Such provenance is often helpful in determining exactly what an object is. Take a look:

Thumper Card

After some research we were able to determine that these ceramic figurines, made by Evan K. Shaw Pottery, were indeed produced in the early 1940’s. But we were still unconvinced that what we had was ‘Thumper’s Girl’.

We began our investigation by checking the Internet for other examples of the piece to see what online Sellers were claiming it was. Some said ‘Thumper’ while others said ‘Miss Bunny’, or ‘Bixbi’, as some Disney fans have named her (she is not given a name in the original movie).

We also found other small ceramic figurines that were definitely depicting a female bunny, that were brown, and posed differently than ours. It was this figurine that was consistently called ‘Miss Bunny’ and not the version we have. So we now had a majority consensus.

But our figurine could still be another version of Miss Bunny, as some were claiming.

CLUE No. 2

Next we need to consider the color of the piece. Let’s have another look at it:

Thumper LeftThumper Right

Brown Fur

This is a confusing clue, but stay with us. Thumper, in the movie Bambi, was gray, not brown. So we could arbitrarily pronounce this character to be Miss Bunny, who was brown, based solely on that parameter. However, pottery companies were notorious for going off-model when creating their pieces, getting features and colors wrong more often than not. It wasn’t until later that Disney started to tighten up on its demands for standardization of its character merchandise.

So this clue is inconclusive.

CLUE NO. 3

Eyelashes have been the stereotypical way of depicting a female character in the world of animation since the beginning of the medium. Our figurine has three short upward eyelashes, and not the multiple swept-back lashes of a female character.

CLUE NO. 4

Sometimes, if you know the character well enough, you can recognize them by body language. Of course, in the case of a sculpture, this technique will depend on the artist portraying such characteristics in his artistry.

Thumper Back

Thumper was very expressive with his ears. Many times he would have one ear up with the other ear down. This was a way of distinguishing him from his many brothers and sisters in the film.

The ceramic figurine we have exhibits this trait.

CLUE NO. 5

Lastly, we checked the figurine for any markings that could help us to identify it.

Thumper Bottom

No such luck!

Ceramic figurines are either stamped with black ink, engraved, or sport a sticker, usually on the bottom of the piece. This example has none of these markings, so no help there for our investigation.

CONCLUSION:

We believe this figurine to be Thumper. And here’s why:

  • General consensus gathered from Internet Sellers
  • Frequency of wrong use of color for Disney characters by manufacturers
  • Eyelashes are consistent with male characters
  • Body language, specifically the ears, is consistent with the character

We hope the techniques of this detailed investigation will help you to identify your treasured pieces of merchandise! And you can see more of Thumper as a lawn ornament by clicking the link. Or for a Disney-themed joke featuring Thumper (and other characters) check out this link.

Scrooge McDuck Ceramic Figurine with Cane

Everyone knows Donald Duck. Some might even know Professor Ludwig Von Drake. But only those who have added comic books to their Disney collections will likely remember Scrooge McDuck:

Scrooge McDuck Front

What is he going to do with that cane?

Scrooge McDuck lives up to his namesake in that he is definitely a miser when it comes to money. So he is probably going to hit someone for trying to take it… or for perhaps asking for a loan.

This character was created in 1947 by Carl Barks and is an elderly Scottish Pekin duck who is portrayed as speaking with a Scottish accent. He is named after Ebenezer Scrooge from the 1843 novel A Christmas Carol written by Charles Dickens. Scrooge is a wealthy business tycoon.

Scrooge McDuck Back

Nice spats!

Within the context of the fictional Duck Universe, Scrooge is the world’s richest person with a “Money Bin” that rivals the vaults of Jack Benny!

Scrooge McDuck Side

Top Hat and Tail Feathers

In the comic books, Scrooge was initially characterized as a greedy miser but in later appearances he was often portrayed as a charitable and thrifty hero, adventurer, explorer, and philanthropist. This version of the character could be seen best in the television series Duck Tales (1987-1990).

Scrooge McDuck Bottom

He is the maternal uncle of Donald Duck and the grand-uncle of Huey, Dewey, and Louie. This figurine stands approximately 5″ tall and is made of some sort of ceramic material. It was manufactured in Japan.

COOL FACT: In tribute to its famous native, Glasgow City Council added Scrooge to its list of “Famous Glaswegians” in 2007.

Donald Duck might not have the business sense of his uncle but he has brokered some impressive deals over the years. Check out his big Orange Juice gig by clicking the link.

Scrooge McDuck isn’t the only member of the Duck Universe to have a link to famous authors or artists. Check out Huey, Dewey, and Louie’s brush with Norman Rockwell by clicking this link.

To see Donald together with his mischievous nephews check them out as they play a Wacky Wigwam game!